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Thursday, 11 August 2022 / Published in News

THE 46th ANNUAL HAY CREEK FESTIVAL RETURNS TO HISTORIC JOANNA FURNACE SEPTEMBER 9 – 11th

CONTACT: Mark Zerr, Executive Director, 610-286-0388 Email: mzerr@haycreek.org

Morgantown, PA . . . Organizers , sponsoring partners and almost 800 interpreters, craftsmen and volunteers are fine-tuning countless details for the opening of the 2022 edition of the Hay Creek Festival. Here festival-goers will witness what a day in the 19th century Joanna Furnace community would have looked like . . . and once again, this community event will indeed be a family experience for ages six to sixty.

Running Friday through Sunday, September 9-10-11, the 46th annual event is held on the grounds of the historic Joanna Furnace Ironworks, an 18th and 19th Century charcoal fueled iron furnace and community. Here visitors travel through time and experience life in a rural industrial iron-making village. The interpretation timeline runs from the beginning of the furnace in 1791 up to the 1950’s. Visitors will experience the sights, sounds, aromas and activities which have long since disappeared from contemporary life.

The Festival runs each day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Parking is free on the festival grounds on Friday.
Free continuously running shuttle buses will be provided from an offsite parking area from 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

The Hay Creek Festival is truly a one-of-a-kind “living history adventure”. The exhibits and demonstrations include traditional early American crafts, a contemporary craft market, living history presentations and interpretations, vintage industrial revolution era working equipment, threshing demonstrations, a working sawmill, children’s hands-on activities, a traditional four-square kitchen herb garden, Civil War and World War II encampments, antique vehicles, steam engines and tractors, traditional folk music presentations, homemade festive foods . . . and more!!

The “Early American Crafts” area includes domestic and village industry demonstrations of skills which were necessary for a self-sustaining rural industrial community through the 18th and 19th centuries. Open fire cooking, bake oven demonstrations, butter & sauerkraut making will take place throughout the weekend. Samples of these early American foods will be available.

This year’s “Creekside Crafts Market” will include such items as redware pottery, ceramics, hand blown glass, dolls cloths, soaps & lotions, jewelry, woodcrafts, antiques and many home décor items. Rebel Hive Meadery of Reading will also be present selling their honey wine.

In the Mechanical Technology area, visitors will see an assortment of early gas and steam engines, models, antique cars & tractors, sawmill and threshing demonstrations and a line shaft powering 100-year old industrial machinery in the Joanna Furnace Mechanical Technology Building. A newly expanded World War II encampment will also be featured in this area.

The Civil War Encampment will celebrate how soldiers lived and trained in the mid-nineteenth century. Visitors can chat with Civil War era soldier and civilian re-enactors to learn more about that epic 19th-century time. Reenactors will also offer a mini skirmish each day at the festival.

Visitors will also want to tour the 18th & 19th Century Joanna Furnace Ironmaking complex. Hay Creek interpreters will be giving various presentations and demonstrations during the weekend in the Blacksmith Shop, Wheelwright Shop, Office/Store, Charcoal Storage Barn & Museum and the Casting House. A 22-minute introductory video on the History of Joanna Furnace will take place each hour in the Blowing Engine House. New this year — visitors will be able to see part of the Ironmaster’s mansion stone foundation. This past summer the Association partnered with the Kutztown University archaeology students for a 4-week field school program. During this time the students conducted ground penetrating radar on the Joanna Furnace site to look for anomalies in the ground and uncovered the northern basement wall of the ironmasters home. The mansion privy was also excavated where various artifacts were discovered.

Once again Hay Creek’s Tri-County Heritage Library will have a special exhibit at our festival. This year the group will display various vintage and antique quilts from the community. Looks for this special attraction in the Joanna Furnace Mule Stable.

Friday, September 9th is designated “Student Day” at the Hay Creek Festival. In past years, as many as 1,000 students have taken advantage of Student Day activities and attended on a single Friday. Public school, private school and home school groups and co-ops are invited to participate in this fun, learning historic experience. (A Student Day registration form can be downloaded from the festival website at www.haycreek.org.)

There will be children’s activities galore throughout the weekend, including archaeological segments, candle and papermaking, early American games, Civil War marching and drilling ….. and much more. Children should pick up their “chores list” at the festival gate which will feature all the hands-on activities at the event. Upon completion of a variety of tasks children will be rewarded with a free wagon ride!

Then there is the food . . . truly a feasting paradise for festival goers! The wide menu is prepared and served by Hay Creek volunteers and community non-profit organizations . . . and includes chicken pot pie, hamburgers, hot dogs, turkey and roast beef sandwiches, sausage sandwiches, festival-favorite Mabel’s open fire cooked soups, breads, hand-dipped ice cream, funnel cakes, French fries, fresh baked goods and so much more. The festival will also feature homemade corn pie and stuffed bell peppers for visitors to enjoy. Freshly pressed apple cider will be made daily in the Joanna Furnace cider mill. Many of the festival foods are also available to purchase to take home.

Our family-friendly admission is $10 for adults, $2 for children ages 6 to 12, FREE admission for children 5 and younger.

The Hay Creek Valley Historical Association’s Joanna Furnace site is located three miles north of Morgantown on Route 10, with close access to both the Pennsylvania Turnpike Morgantown Interchange 298 and Route I 176.

Free continuously running shuttle buses move visitors effortlessly from the parking area to the Festival grounds and back. Buses run Saturday and Sunday only from 9:30 am to 6 pm. (All parking on Friday is on the Joanna Furnace site.) For the safety of visitors, all are encouraged to park safely on the easy access lots just off Route 10. Main Festival events occur 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. all three days. For more information, visit www.haycreek.org .

Thursday, 04 November 2021 / Published in News

The evenings of December 3—5, visitors to Joanna Furnace will be whisked away from the anticipation of their own Christmas season—back to the joyous celebration of the Christmas of 1871. Whether families come for unique holiday shopping, wonderful light holiday treats, to experience the candlelit 200-year-old furnace complex, to hear Christmas music, or even have the kids encounter the Belsnickel . . . everyone is enthralled by the transformation of Joanna Furnace into a 19th-century-holiday experience.

Christmas 1871 was a grand time for the ironmaster’s family and the residents of the Joanna Furnace community. They celebrated the Holiday and gave thanks that the furnace was busy providing income to so many families. Additionally, this year, the ironmaster and his wife are celebrating their fourth Christmas together. Visitors of all ages will be able to experience that long-ago time and gain a new perspective on their holiday celebration.

Candlelight illuminates the entire furnace complex.

The historic site takes on an entirely new radiance — over one thousand glowing luminaries warmly light various furnace walkways. Visitors are encouraged to explore the furnace complex by following the clearly defined pathways. All aspects of this nighttime event set the stage for an unforgettable family experience. Visitors are urged to bring cameras.

Also, carefully placed lighting illuminates the historic buildings’ exteriors to give visitors a new perspective of the furnace complex. Inside, each building is illuminated by lamps or candles to recreate an 1890s atmosphere.

The Joanna furnace Mule Stable is transformed into the parlor of the Victorian mansion of Iron Master L. Heber Smith and his wife Ella Jane Grubb Smith. As visitors enter the candle lit parlor, they will see and smell the pleasant aroma of the freshly cut cedar Christmas Tree.

In the parlor, the Smith family members have gathered to prepare for a beautiful family Christmas celebration complete with a dining room table set for their upcoming feast, playing parlor games and will be sharing stories about past Christmases at Joanna Furnace by the fireplace. Guests are invited to interact with family members to learn more about the family and life in the iron furnace community.

Victorian dancing will also take place at the event in a large heated tent. The Hay Creek Trio will perform various old-time music while the Hay Creek Dancers will entertain visitors with period dances. Guests are also invited to step onto the dance floor and take place in the period dancing.

Outside, in front of the stage, the largest of the roaring bonfires becomes the focal point of the furnace community. Here all can warm up by the fire and enjoy bonfire performances by local community organizations on the stage. Near the holiday bonfire, from time to time, the Belsnickel has been known to appear and delight visiting children.

Traditional wagon rides give visitors an alternative way to explore Joanna Furnace. Rides are $2 per person and occur weather permitting. The historic buildings will be open for visitors to explore on self-guided walking tours of the complex. Visitors can visit the Blacksmith Shop, Casting House, Wheelwright Shop and Office/Store.

Savor festival foods
The Hay Creek Historians are proud to provide guests with a variety of delicious holiday foods. Enjoy such homemade foods as sausage sandwiches; hot dogs; hamburgers, pork and sauerkraut & mashed potatoes; macaroni & cheese, soups, chili; and French fries. Warm-up with a steaming cup of hot chocolate, hot mulled cider or coffee.

Visitors can enter the Christmas Gift Basket Raffle. These baskets contain valuable items and certificates. All the baskets together contain over $2000 worth of gifts and gift certificates donated by the area business community.

The youngsters can visit the Kid’s Santa Craft Workshop and face painting inside one of the heated tents. The Morgantown Arts Center will be providing various holiday craft activities for children in this workshop.

The Christmas Craft Market provides a showcase for visitors to shop for holiday gifts and home decorating items. Selected items available for purchase from the handpicked vendors include things such as baked goods & breads, cheese cakes; assorted holiday décor items and crafts; hand-made wood Items; homemade soaps. Other unique gift items such as hand-crafted blacksmith items, hand-knit scarves, beeswax manager scenes & ornaments, jewelry, candles, fresh Christmas wreaths and more are available. Rebel Hive Meadery from Lancaster, PA will also be at the event giving out samples and selling their delicious wines by the bottle.

Admission is $10.00 for adults, Children 12 & under are Free. Parking is free on-site.

Christmas at Joanna” happens Friday December 3, from 5 pm to 9 pm and Saturday and Sunday, December 4 & 5, 4 pm to 9 pm at Historic Joanna Furnace Iron Works “Where the Spirit of Christmas Comes Alive”!

Joanna Furnace is located three miles north of Morgantown off Route 10. Look for signs and enter by turning on Furnace Road. Parking is available on site and along Furnace Road. A safely lighted, easily accessible parking area is located along Furnace Road. For the safety of visitors, all are encouraged to avoid parking along route 10.

The Hay Creek Valley Historical Association is a non-profit organization. Net event proceeds support the education, research, restoration and preservation of the significant 18th & 19th century Joanna Furnace Iron Works and its community. For additional information visit www.haycreek.org, friend Joanna Furnace on Facebook or call 610-286-0388.

Thursday, 19 August 2021 / Published in News

THE 45th ANNUAL HAY CREEK FESTIVAL RETURNS TO HISTORIC JOANNA FURNACE SEPTEMBER 10 – 12th

CONTACT:     Mark Zerr, Executive Director, 610-286-0388  Email: mzerr@haycreek.org

Morgantown, PA . . . Organizers , sponsoring partners and almost 800 interpreters, craftsmen and volunteers are fine-tuning countless details for the opening of the 2021 edition of the Hay Creek Festival.  Here festival-goers will witness what a day in the 19th century Joanna Furnace community would have looked like . . .  and once again, this community event will indeed be a family experience for ages six to sixty.

Running Friday through Sunday, September 10-11-12, the 45th  annual event is held on the grounds of the historic Joanna Furnace Ironworks, an 18th and 19th Century charcoal fueled iron furnace and community. Here visitors travel through time and experience life in a rural industrial iron-making village. The interpretation timeline runs from the beginning of the furnace in 1791 up to the 1950’s. Visitors will experience the sights, sounds, aromas and activities which have long since disappeared from contemporary life.

The Festival runs each day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Parking is free on the festival grounds on Friday. 
Free continuously running shuttle buses will be provided from an offsite parking area from 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. 

The Hay Creek Festival is truly a one-of-a-kind “living history adventure”.  The exhibits and demonstrations include traditional early American crafts, a contemporary craft market, living history presentations and interpretations, vintage industrial revolution era working equipment, threshing demonstrations, a working sawmill, children’s hands-on activities, a traditional four-square kitchen herb garden, Civil War and World War II encampments, antique vehicles, steam engines and tractors, traditional folk music presentations, homemade festive foods . . .  and more!!

The “Early American Crafts” area includes domestic and village industry demonstrations of skills which were necessary for a self-sustaining rural industrial community through the 18th and 19th centuries.   Open fire cooking, food preservation and bake oven demonstrations will take place throughout the weekend.    Samples of these early American foods will be available.

This year’s “Creekside Crafts Market” will include such items as redware pottery, ceramics, dolls cloths, soaps & lotions, jewelry, woodcrafts, antiques and many home décor items.

In the Mechanical Technology area, visitors will see an assortment of early gas and steam engines, models, antique cars & tractors, sawmill and threshing demonstrations and a line shaft powering 100-year old industrial machinery in the Joanna Furnace Mechanical Technology Building.  A newly expanded World War II encampment will also be featured in this area. 

The Civil War Encampment will celebrate how soldiers lived and trained in the mid-nineteenth century.  Visitors can chat with Civil War era soldier and civilian re-enactors to learn more about that epic 19th-century time.  Reenactors will also offer a mini skirmish each day at the festival.

For the first time, visitors will be able to see Hay Creek’s latest restoration project – The Joanna Furnace Wheelwright Shop.   This “from the ground up’ restoration project began in 2019 and was completed in the spring of 2020. This new historic building houses the Parke Fleming wheelwright tool collection from Geigertown. The wheelwright shop will be used for live interpretation of the wheelwright’s activities. This building has been underwritten by an anonymous donor family of the Hay Creek Valley Historical Association.

The festival will also have a new exhibit in the Joanna Furnace Mule Stable.  Hay Creek’s new Tri-County Heritage Library committee will exhibit various artifacts and displays from the community including Grace Mines,  Col. Jacob Morgan’s home, World War II veterans and more local relics.

Friday, September 10th is designated “Student Day” at the Hay Creek Festival. In past years, as many as 1,000 students have taken advantage of Student Day activities and attended on a single Friday. Public school, private school and home school groups and co-ops are invited to participate in this fun, learning historic experience. (A Student Day registration form can be downloaded from the festival website at www.haycreek.org.)

There will be children’s activities galore throughout the weekend, including archaeological segments, candle and papermaking, early American games, Civil War marching and drilling ….. and much more.  Children should pick up their “chores list” at the festival gate which will feature all the hands-on activities at the event.  Upon completion of a variety of tasks children will be rewarded with a free wagon ride!

Then there is the food . . . truly a feasting paradise for festival goers! The wide menu is prepared and served by Hay Creek volunteers and community non-profit organizations . . . and includes chicken pot pie, hamburgers, hot dogs, turkey and roast beef sandwiches, festival-favorite Mabel’s open fire cooked soups, breads, hand-dipped ice cream, funnel cakes, French fries and so much more.  The festival will also feature homemade corn and shepherd’s pie for visitors to enjoy.  Freshly pressed apple cider will be made daily in the Joanna Furnace cider mill.  Many of the festival foods are also available to purchase to take home.

Our family-friendly  admission is $10 for adults, $2 for children ages 6 to 12, FREE admission for children 5 and younger.

The Hay Creek Valley Historical Association’s Joanna Furnace site is located three miles north of Morgantown on Route 10, with close access to both the Pennsylvania Turnpike Morgantown Interchange 298 and Route I 176.

Free continuously running shuttle buses move visitors effortlessly from the parking area to the Festival grounds and back. Buses run Saturday and Sunday only from 9:30 am to 6 pm. (All parking on Friday is on the Joanna Furnace site.)  For the safety of visitors, all are encouraged to park safely on the easy access lots just off Route 10. Main Festival events occur 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. all three days. For more information, visit www.haycreek.org .

Wednesday, 19 May 2021 / Published in News

Fascinated by 19th-century history? Interested in early technology, crafts, cooking, or how about the art of ironmaking? Enjoy working with visitors, children and school groups? The Hay Creek Valley Historical Association and the Joanna Furnace Ironworks are now recruiting friendly persons who are interested in volunteering to be historical site tour guides or who just want to learn a little about an Early American Craft from our community.

Open enrollment for our 2021 series begins now. Each of these classes brings an aspect of the Joanna Furnace community story to life. These engaging classes are for learners 16 years and up.



  • Class sizes are capped so register early to ensure your participation.
  • Registration deadline is one week before the scheduled class.
  • See registration form.
  • Reservations are required.
  • Space is limited, due to COVID-19 restrictions. Most classes will be held outdoors, under cover, instilling COVID-19 requirements of masks and social distancing.

These classes are designed for anyone with either a casual interest in history or those looking to become part of the Historic Joanna Furnace Interpretation Team and be a Tour Guides or for those who are looking for a new hobby or craft.

Each year over 30,000 people visit Joanna Furnace. The education programs reach over 2,000 students from Berks, Chester and Lancaster Counties. Since 1980, over 1.1 million guests have visited Joanna Furnace.

The classes offered in 2021 are as follows:

History of Joanna Furnace TUESDAY, APRIL 13 7 pm to 8:30 pm
Presenter: Gary Kurtz

Designed for volunteers to interact with the general public during events and welcome them to the Joanna Furnace Site. The class includes watching and discussing the History of Joanna Furnace video and reviewing of a training guide that will assist you at events. The goal is to have a general understanding of the significance of the Joanna Furnace site and to be able to communicate with guests from that perspective.

Gary Kurtz has been an active member of the HCVHA. He is a Board Member and is involved in several leadership roles including restoration and history. One of his specialized areas of expertise is in outdoor oven homemade bread making. Gary is a talented educator and well-rounded historic interpreter.

Letters of a Daughter’s Devotion Preserved for Centuries TUESDAY, APRIL 20 7 pm to 8:30 pm
Presenter: Juliana Flora

Juliana Flora, the great-great-granddaughter of the last Joanna Furnace Ironmaster, will share letters written in the 1880’s by her great-great- grandmother Ella Jane Grubb Smith. Juliana will share letters written in the 1860’s & 1870’s about the Joanna Furnace.

Juliana Flora is the HCVHA President and has a wide-ranging genealogical collection of her family memorabilia and enjoys sharing the history with the public.

Learn to be a Joanna Furnace Tour Guide TUESDAY, APRIL 27 7 pm to 8:30 pm
Presenter: Joanna Furnace Interpreters

Designed for volunteers to interact with the general public during events and welcome them to the Joanna Furnace Site. The class focuses on hands-on training inside the historic Joanna Furnace Buildings. Various Joanna Furnace Interpreters will discuss their personal perspectives on how they approach interpretation in a building. Volunteer garb will also be reviewed at the class. The goal is to have a general understanding of the significance of the Joanna Furnace site and to be able to communicate with guests from that perspective.

19th Century Metal Casting—hands-on SATURDAY MAY 1 10 am to 12 pm
Presenter : Jack Woods

We will provide the basic information required to make a sand mold by using a pattern. The mold cavity made will then be filled with molten aluminum. If we’ve done a good job of training you, you will have a casting to take home with you! Also discussed during the class will be information about the (Joanna) Furnace, Casting House, metal casting products (pig iron, 10-plate stoves, hollowware, etc.) and procedures. Also: Iron ore, limestone, charcoal and slag will be discussed.

Jack Woods has been a member the HCVHA for 8 years. He is a former educator who specialized in Tech Education. After leaving public education, he worked for a rescue mission and for the Middletown & Hummelstown Railroad. While at the railroad, one of his functions was working to renovate a steam locomotive and passenger coach. When Jack is at Joanna Furnace, he is an educator and interpreter working in the casting house. There he and his team demonstrate the process of mold making and casting, as it was done at the 19th century Joanna Furnace. He is one of the HCVHA volunteers who designed and created the casting house interpretation. He has also published articles in Industrial Arts Education, the NY State Canal Society, and the HCVHA Journal.

Basic of Watercolor – hands on SATURDAY, MAY 8 10 am to 1 pm
Instructor: Anna Carter

Anna Carter will be at the Furnace to teach watercolor painting. This will be a themed class, relating to the time period of the furnace. The class will last approximately 3 hours. This is a beginner class and no experience is needed. The class is recommended for ages 13 and up.

Supplies you will need to bring along: Paint brushes, watercolor paper, and watercolor paints. If you do not have your own, you may borrow Anna’s. A light snack will be provided.

Open Fire Cooking —hands-on SATURDAY, MAY 15 9 am to 3 pm
Instructor: Barbara Esterly

Join Barbara Esterly, as she shows you the basic concepts of open fire cooking, which will be transferrable to open hearth cooking. You will do hands on preparation of foods and sample your creations. The flavor of food cooked over an open fire is truly unique. You will discuss fire safety principles, learn about various cooking tools, pots and utensils of the 18th and 19th centuries. We will make a traditional stew/soup, a pie, mush and sausage and apples cooked in cider. This class is for ages 16 yrs old and up.

Supplies you will need to bring along: You may bring a lunch or light snack along, although you will more than likely be eating what you make! Yum!

Barbara Esterly, has been an active volunteer at the Furnace. One of her specialized areas of expertise is in outdoor open fire cooking and hearth cooking. Barb is a talented educator and well-rounded historic interpreter.

Bake Oven Demonstrating —hands-on SATURDAY, MAY 22 9 am to 3 pm
Instructor: Gary Kurtz

Masonry ovens have been built in American homes since the first colonists landed in New England. These brick ovens were used to bake bread, pies and cookies. Although very few of these ovens exist today, the historic Joanna Furnace site houses two reproduction ovens that are used for interpretation at events and program. During this class participants will learn how to “fire-up” and “maintain” a stove for baking; plus, will mix their own bread and pie to be baked in the oven. A bag lunch will be provided for the participants on this day.

Gary Kurtz has been an active member of the HCVHA. He is a Board Member and is involved in several leadership roles including restoration and history. One of his specialized areas of expertise is in outdoor oven homemade bread making. Gary is a talented educator and well-rounded historic interpreter.

Design Your Own Redware Plate – hands-on SATURDAY, JUNE 5 1 pm to 4 pm
Instructor: Andrew Loercher

Design your own redware plate. Andrew Loecher, potter from Lancaster County, and vendor at the Hay Creek Festival, will be offering a class for you to design your own plate. Andy will take your plates with him to fire, and they will be returned to you within 2 weeks. You will be contacted to set up a pick up date/time.

Supplies you will need to bring along: rolling pin, old newspaper, sturdy tin pie pan (not aluminum) and the picture or design you would like to put on your plate. (The more simple the picture, the easier the project)

Make A Wool Braided Rug – hands-on SATURDAY, JUNE 12 10 am to 3:30 pm
Instructor: Eileen Colligan

Eileen Colligan will be at the Joanna Furnace to teach us the basics of making our own wool braided rug. Cost is for 2 days, Day 1. Students will learn the basics of braiding a round rug. The morning class will be devoted to preparing the wool, review of tools, learning the T start, lacing and more. The afternoon session will be hands on. Participants should be able to create a small round rug (hot pad size) by the end of class. This rug can be enlarged on the participants own time to any size desired. Day 2. (Saturday, June 19 from 1pm – 4pm) The afternoon will be devoted to helping students and also demonstrating ways to end a braided rug. If you have any issues when you are working on your rug during the week, feel free to stop back and Eileen will gladly give you the guidance to help keep your rug on track.

Supplies you will need to bring along: Lunch or a snack, since this class will go over lunchtime. Participants should bring a small sewing kit and good scissors to class. Wool will be provided to practice and start the rug. Color and amount of wool provided is limited. (If participants chose to bring their own wool, it must be washed. Email the instructor before class to determine if the wool will work at nennie105@aol.com).

Make A Wool Penny Rug – hands-on SATURDAY, JUNE 19 10 am to 12 pm
Instructor: Eileen Colligan

Eileen Colligan will be at the Furnace to teach us how to make wool penny rugs. A small penny rug kit will be provided. Participants will be given a demonstration of how to create a Penny rug. Embroidery stitches typically found in Penny rugs will be taught. Individual help will be provided. Participants should be able to complete or nearly complete this rug in class.

Supplies you will need to bring along: Lunch or a snack, since this class could go over lunchtime. Participants should bring scissors to this class.

Make A Toothbrush Rug – hands-on SATURDAY, JULY 10 9 am to 3 pm
Instructor: Tammy Schaeffer

Tammy will show you how to make a toothbrush rug with an unusual tool and scrap material. This is a no sew rug and is made from any type of scrap material. We will provide the sewing tool, which is included in the price. The material for this rug is based off of color, not pattern. Bring any scraps you may have, tear them in 2” strips, fold in half and iron.

Supplies you will need to bring along: We will have some materials to select from, but you may bring your own. Lunch or a snack, since this class will go over lunchtime.


Make A Wooly Christmas Tree – hands-on SATURDAY, JULY 24 9 am to 3 pm
Instructor: Tammy Schaeffer

It‘s Christmas in July!! Tammy will be back at the Furnace to show you how to make your own Wooly Christmas Tree (based off the feather tree concept). These can be in any color for any holiday…not just Christmas.

Supplies you will need to bring along: Sharp snipping scissors, a ruler and lunch or a snack, since this class will go over lunchtime.

Make A Snowman Plaque – hands-on SATURDAY, JULY 31 9 am to 3 pm
Instructor: Beki Ziegler

It’s STILL Christmas in July!! Beki Ziegler will be here to show you how to paint and design a snowman from a pallet base.

Supplies you will need to bring along: Lunch or a snack, since this class will go over lunchtime. Beki will provide all the supplies.




Make A Round Basket with Wood Base – hands-on SATURDAY, AUGUST 14 9 am to 3 pm
Instructor: Mary Zeplin

Local weaver, Mary Zeplin, will be here to teach you how to make a round basket with a wooden base.

Supplies you will need to bring along: Lunch or a snack, since this class will go over lunchtime. Mary will provide all the supplies.

Make (6) Redware Ornaments – hands-on SATURDAY, AUGUST 21 1 pm to 4 pm
Instructor: Andrew Loercher

Andrew Loercher, will be back offering a class for you to design and create 6 Christmas ornaments. Andy will take your ornaments with him to fire, and they will be returned to you within 2 weeks. You will be contacted to set up a pick up date/time.

Supplies you will need to bring along: rolling pin, old newspaper, cookie cutters



These classes are for ALL skill levels!

Please come out and support the Furnace, while having some fun with friends!

To register click on the following link

The Hay Creek Valley Historical Association is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable organization dedicated to the preservation and education of America’s iron heritage. Net proceeds from this event support the restoration and educational projects of The Hay Creek Valley Historical Association and Joanna Furnace, a historically significant 18th and 19th-century charcoal-fueled iron furnace. The Joanna Furnace site is located three miles north of Morgantown, along Route 10. For entrance turn at Furnace Road.

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